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The state should have paid the church instead of educating Africa, which is uneducated!

 

The Executive Director of the Educate Africa Institute (EAI), Mr. William Boadu, is not meticulous in his representation of the organization, which bills itself as an authority on education for Africa.

The state should have paid the church instead of educating Africa, which is uneducated!
The state should have paid the church instead of educating Africa, which is uneducated!

How are they going to succeed throughout all of Africa if they have failed in their motherland? EAI is ignorant of the effects of church taxes. They have been making both direct and indirect tax payments to the state.

Reacting to the Statement and Filing the Petition Below!

Rev. Emmanuel Boachie, Head Pastor of Souls’ Pasture Church, Gh. A/R, Kumasi Asuofua-ACHIASE; +233 (0) 240 37 59 59; COUNTRY Director of Awesome Bible College.

Scrap taxes and commercial churches taxes
The Education Africa Institute’s (EAI) executive director, William Boadi, has petitioned the government to impose taxes on commercial churches and eliminate the levy on sanitary items.

The two main concerns raised by the petition are the taxation of churches that conduct business and the sanitary pad tax.

He claims that as of March 15, 2024, Ghana is said to have more than 3,500 churches, many of which are engaged in profitable businesses including consulting and the sale of drinks like Sobolo, which are sold as having religious importance.

In an open letter to the government, he gave an explanation of how, in spite of these profitable ventures, churches have been able to avoid paying taxes, which has left the government short on funds for development projects.

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Speaking for concerned citizens, William Boadi underlined the need to hold religious organizations responsible for their business practices.

“We, the undersigned Ghanaian citizens, write to you to request that the tax laws of our country be just and equitable.

“As of March 15, 2024, there are reportedly 3511 churches functioning within our boundaries; many of these are involved in for-profit endeavors, including charging for consultations and selling regional beverages like Sobolo, which is frequently promoted as a representation of Jesus’s blood.

A portion of the latter stated, “These churches avoid taxes despite their successful endeavors, depriving our government of much-needed revenue for development initiatives.”

According to Boadi, appropriate taxation policies for churches will guarantee their fair participation in the country’s development initiatives.

Concerns are also expressed in the petition about the government’s proposal to charge for sanitary pads, which are necessary for women’s cleanliness and health. Boadi contends that imposing a tax on sanitary pads is an unfair financial burden on women, especially those from underprivileged backgrounds who find it difficult to pay for these essentials, as menstruation is a normal biological function.

Furthermore, the government’s plan to tax sanitary pads—a necessary item for women’s health and hygiene—deeply disturbs us. Menstruation is not a luxury or a business opportunity; rather, it is a normal biological event.

However, the government unfairly burdens women—especially young, jobless women—who find it difficult to afford these essentials by taxing sanitary pads. The letter also said that the impact on the economy “perpetuates cycles of poverty and inequality, contributing to widespread challenges like teenage pregnancies.”

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See the statement in its entirety below:

We, the undersigned Ghanaian citizens, are writing to you to request that the tax laws of our country be fair and just.

There are estimated to be 3511 churches functioning within our borders as of March 15, 2024; many of these churches are involved in profit-making ventures, including charging for consultations and selling regional beverages like Sobolo, which is frequently promoted as a representation of Jesus’s blood.

Even with these lucrative endeavors, some churches avoid paying taxes, depriving our government of vital funds for development projects.

In addition, we find it quite concerning that the government has decided to tax sanitary pads, which are necessary for women’s cleanliness and health.

Menstruation is not a luxury or a business opportunity; rather, it is a normal biological event. However, the government unfairly burdens women—especially young, jobless women—who find it difficult to afford these essentials by taxing sanitary pads.

Widespread issues like teenage pregnancies are exacerbated by this economic hardship, which also feeds the cycle of poverty and inequality.

We demand that the government act immediately to implement the following measures:

1. Church taxes: It’s time to hold religious organizations, including churches, accountable for their business ventures. These businesses are abusing loopholes in our tax system by offering consultations for profit and selling drinks like Sobolo without paying taxes.

Ensuring that churches contribute equitably to national development initiatives would be possible with the implementation of fair taxation rules.

2. Elimination of VAT on sanitary pads: Periodontal hygiene products are vital to the health and welfare of women. In addition to making gender disparities worse, taxing these goods thwarts initiatives to advance the health and dignity of women.

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In order to ensure menstrual justice and lessen the financial burden on women—especially those who are unemployed or economically disadvantaged—it is imperative that taxes on sanitary pads be removed.

3. Examining the socioeconomic effects: It is impossible to overlook the connections between social issues and tax laws. Excessive levies on sanitary pads have a disproportionate impact on women’s access to jobs, education, and healthcare, which feeds the cycle of inequality and poverty.

The government can empower women and advance gender equality by enacting fair taxation laws and funding initiatives that encourage accessibility and education on menstrual health.

Finally, we implore Ghana’s government to give fairness, equity, and justice first priority in its tax policies by properly taxing churches and eliminating sanitary pad levies.

These actions are necessary to create a more just society in which every person has equal access to the tools and assistance they require to prosper.

We beseech the administration to take our plea for the betterment of our country and its citizens seriously, standing together in our call for action.

Regards,

Boadi William

Executive Director of Educationist and Educate Africa Institute (EAI).

 

The state should have paid the church instead of educating Africa, which is uneducated!
The state should have paid the church instead of educating Africa, which is uneducated!

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